Lifestyle

Drinking

Alcohol is a social medium used extensively in the services, leaving dos, beer calls, after work wind downs, with the boss, with friends and it can sometimes be very difficult to avoid. There is also a stigma attached to non participants.

Everything is okay in moderation but add stress to the equation, marital problems, trouble at work and the situation can quickly become out of hand. The RAF is attempting to combat the situation in many ways. Drinking at lunchtime was discouraged many years ago and there is now a big push to establish no alcoholic meeting venues on stations, coffee shops etc.

If things have already gone too far the following there are those who can help. See our section on Family Support

Fitness

We all know that fitness contrbutes to a healthy lifestyle, but did you know that families of RAF personnel are able to use the Stn sports facilities and join in with organised classes. See the Stn PEd staff for further information. 

Organisations who would like to help

Many organisations approach the Federation looking to assist serving personnel and their family members. Please find here a list of them for you to consider:

Healing Hands Network

Healing Hands Network helps people suffering from the mental, physical and emotional after-effects of war and disaster. They have been working in Sarajevo bringing help and hope, to people suffering from the terrible after-effects of war.

   "Our aims are simple - to use our healing hands to help anyone who needs our skills. Lasting damage takes time to heal. The neglected victims of the hidden horrors of disaster - those who have lost their homes and families, those who have lost limbs, those who have been raped or tortured, those who have no hope - need help long after the front-line aid workers have left.

    "They are now also running a pilot project to help returning servicemen and women and their families in the UK. We know that we really do make a difference..."

 

The Chaseley Trust

The Chaseley Trust cares for people with severe physical disabilities from all walks of life, but active and former service personnel are particularly welcome and they maintain close links with affiliated service charities and organisations, ensuring such residents and their families have access to any help and assistance they need.  Around a third of their residents have served with the armed forces.  

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